JUNE gallery


Twelve Galleries Project's JUNE gallery presents . . . 

Feel Good Foregone  

A solo exhibition by Carrick Bell

June 19 - July 12, 2009  

In this new body of work, Feel Good Foregone, an experimental yet detached cinematic approach permits Carrick Bell’s video installations to combine specific symbology with vague mini-narratives that are nearly absent of plot. To maintain an investment in the history of art, each video teeters between a nostalgia made up of rickety techniques that conjures ideas of the outmoded and clichéd and a sneaky modishness brought forth by polished compositions and scenes of abstraction.

In many circumstances within this body of work, an anonymous figure in the videos seeks a more or less banal pleasure, paralleling the overarching question: Is it possible to derive pleasure from mediation, whether it be visual pleasure from an excessively mediated representation of nature, or the conflicted pleasure of a sincere investment in an ironic gesture?   

JUNE gallery is the tenth of twelve galleries that show the work of emerging artists and intellectuals over the course of one year. With each new month, a new location is selected and a new gallery is formed. Each gallery's exhibition life is just one month. Brought to you by the Twelve Galleries Project.

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  • Will have come down not otherwise and none too soon; 2009; installation with single channel video.

    Will have come down not otherwise and none too soon is a near motionless and restless re-enactment of a standard editing technique used to indicate the passage of time and distance greater than that which has been shot. Loosely based on a scene from Kill Bill in which the Bride slowly crosses a desert after being buried alive, this video explores messianism in popular cinema. The animation is an unsettling of the basic form of picturesque framing. Shot in a gully in Saugatuck, Michigan, the video reinscribes landscapes with elements from film. Combining contemporary tropes of landscape as a metaphorical site for conflict and heroism, with formal components of the historical picturesque, Will have come down not otherwise and none too soon articulates the convoluted metaphorical economy between landscape, cinema, art historical genre, and the production of affectively invested viewing. Click the title to link to the full video.

  • Will have come down not otherwise and none too soon; 2009; installation with single channel video.

    Video-still: opening scene. Click the title to link to the full video.

  • Things done done better; 2008; installation with single channel video.

    Things done done better makes use of fluorescent colors as both functional and symbolic markers of the manmade/nonnatural/dangerous. Taking place in an ambiguous site, drips and streams of fluorescents are replaced with stock footage of natural disasters. Over the course of the fifteen minute video, several dozen pigment filled eggs are dropped down the side of a backlit bathtub. Intermittently, the faux Morris Louis meets tempera abstractions are chroma-keyed out and replaced with a variety of YouTube videos of natural disasters. Underwater volcano eruptions, mudslides, fire tornadoes, and avalanches are brought in to function as a corollary to the fluorescent colors, one type of visual titillation substituting for another. Mixing private space with theatrical space with slight nudges to hybrid culinary creations (egg drop soup) and typical symptoms of male hysteric trans-species reproductive fantasies (the desire to give birth via chicken egg), Things done done better maps out the nonsensical overlapping of fantasy life, visual pleasure, and metaphors of the natural. Click the title to link to the full video.

  • I don’t know what kind of ride you are but I’m not getting off; 2008-2009; single channel video.

    I don’t know what kind of ride you are but I’m not getting off stems from a more generic cinematic trope; the momentous (re)unification of lovers. In various degrees of abandon, a clinging figure repeatedly slides up and down a tree. Clothed in something resembling a lavender poncho with full head covering and rodeo-style fringe (essentially gay rodeo kitsch), the figure's slow, rhythmic grinding is simultaneously erotic, hypnotizing and eerie. Click the title to link to the full video.

  • Just you wait and see baby; 2008-2009; double channel video.

    Just you wait and see baby is drawn from the third of an early 1980’s George Romero compilation of five horror stories by Stephen King, in which a jealous husband buries his wife and her lover up to their necks at low tide, Carrick’s piece treats the cameras as if they were the subjects of this plot. His particular interest lies in an attempt to mimic the foreshadowing (and its affective results) of horror films. Click the title to link to the full video.

  • Will have come down not otherwise and none too soon; 2009; installation with single channel video.

    Will have come down not otherwise and none too soon is a near motionless and restless re-enactment of a standard editing technique used to indicate the passage of time and distance greater than that which has been shot. Loosely based on a scene from Kill Bill in which the Bride slowly crosses a desert after being buried alive, this video explores messianism in popular cinema. The animation is an unsettling of the basic form of picturesque framing. Shot in a gully in Saugatuck, Michigan, the video reinscribes landscapes with elements from film. Combining contemporary tropes of landscape as a metaphorical site for conflict and heroism, with formal components of the historical picturesque, Will have come down not otherwise and none too soon articulates the convoluted metaphorical economy between landscape, cinema, art historical genre, and the production of affectively invested viewing. Click the title to link to the full video.

  • Will have come down not otherwise and none too soon; 2009; installation with single channel video.

    Video-still: opening scene. Click the title to link to the full video.

  • Things done done better; 2008; installation with single channel video.

    Things done done better makes use of fluorescent colors as both functional and symbolic markers of the manmade/nonnatural/dangerous. Taking place in an ambiguous site, drips and streams of fluorescents are replaced with stock footage of natural disasters. Over the course of the fifteen minute video, several dozen pigment filled eggs are dropped down the side of a backlit bathtub. Intermittently, the faux Morris Louis meets tempera abstractions are chroma-keyed out and replaced with a variety of YouTube videos of natural disasters. Underwater volcano eruptions, mudslides, fire tornadoes, and avalanches are brought in to function as a corollary to the fluorescent colors, one type of visual titillation substituting for another. Mixing private space with theatrical space with slight nudges to hybrid culinary creations (egg drop soup) and typical symptoms of male hysteric trans-species reproductive fantasies (the desire to give birth via chicken egg), Things done done better maps out the nonsensical overlapping of fantasy life, visual pleasure, and metaphors of the natural. Click the title to link to the full video.

  • I don’t know what kind of ride you are but I’m not getting off; 2008-2009; single channel video.

    I don’t know what kind of ride you are but I’m not getting off stems from a more generic cinematic trope; the momentous (re)unification of lovers. In various degrees of abandon, a clinging figure repeatedly slides up and down a tree. Clothed in something resembling a lavender poncho with full head covering and rodeo-style fringe (essentially gay rodeo kitsch), the figure's slow, rhythmic grinding is simultaneously erotic, hypnotizing and eerie. Click the title to link to the full video.

  • Just you wait and see baby; 2008-2009; double channel video.

    Just you wait and see baby is drawn from the third of an early 1980’s George Romero compilation of five horror stories by Stephen King, in which a jealous husband buries his wife and her lover up to their necks at low tide, Carrick’s piece treats the cameras as if they were the subjects of this plot. His particular interest lies in an attempt to mimic the foreshadowing (and its affective results) of horror films. Click the title to link to the full video.